Tag Archives: viburnum plicatum

Viburnum Plicatum ‘Shoshoni’

This is a re-post of an older entry of mine (with a few tweaks) but felt it was appropriate for this time of year as we anxiously wait for the viburnum blooms to emerge. This one has been a consistent performer for me since day one. Enjoy:       

All gardeners are in search of plants that offer multi-seasonal interest, especially those of us living in colder climates. We also love plants that are dynamic and change throughout the seasons; plants that reinvent themselves as the months go by. Well ladies and gents, I would like to share one of those with you today.

I have lived in my current home for about six years and when we moved in, we had a completely blank slate. Not a plant to be found other than one large tree at the back of the property. The first shrub I planted was a Viburnum Plicatum ‘Shoshoni’. I had never had owned one before (do we really own our plants? A debate for another day) since I didn’t have enough space. Viburnums are typically large specimens but when I found ‘Shoshoni’ at the local nursery (thank you Rutgers Nursery) I was pumped to see that is was more diminutive than most.

Some of it’s attributes:        

  • It is a doublefile viburnum and a seedling of the larger, more well known ‘Shasta’ 
  • It reaches a height of 5 feet and a width of 8 feet
  • Survives from zone 5 to zone 8 
  • Deciduous shrub 
  • It has been deer resistant so far for me (although now jinxed)
  • Blooms in the late Spring, typically for 2-3 weeks in May
  • The flowers are flat topped and are not fragrant (although I have no sense of smell and cannot confirm officially)
  • Thrive in part shade to full sun
  • Produces red berries in August that mature black (I must admit I do not know if the fact that I have other viburnums present lead to the production of berries since this was my first year with berries )  
  • Tolerant of most soil types (including NJ clay)  

Here it is fully leafed out in early spring

In full bloom in May

The leaves curled after blooming giving it an interesting design appeal

The berries emerging in August (which were quickly eaten by the birds)

Phenomenal fall color prior to the leaves falling off

The branch structure even provides a level of interest in the dead of winter

Viburnum Plicatum ‘Shoshoni’

All gardeners are in search of plants that offer multi-seasonal interest, especially those of us living in colder climates. We also love plants that are dynamic and change throughout the seasons; plants that reinvent themselves as the months go by. Well ladies and gents, I would like to share one of those with you today.

I have lived in my current home for about six years and when we moved in, we had a completely blank slate. Not a plant to be found other than one large tree at the back of the property. The first shrub I planted was a Viburnum Plicatum ‘Shoshoni’. I had never had owned one before (do we really own our plants? A debate for another day) since I didn’t have enough space. Viburnums are typically large specimens but when I found ‘Shoshoni’ at the local nursery (thank you Rutgers Nursery) I was pumped to see that is was more diminutive than most.

Some of it’s attributes:        

  • It is a doublefile viburnum and a seedling of the larger, more well known ‘Shasta’ 
  • It reaches a height of 5 feet and a width of 8 feet
  • Survives from zone 5 to zone 8 
  • Deciduous shrub 
  • It has been deer resistant so far for me (although now jinxed)
  • Blooms in the late Spring, typically for 2-3 weeks in May
  • The flowers are flat topped and are not fragrant (although I have no sense of smell and cannot confirm officially)
  • Thrive in part shade to full sun
  • Produces red berries in August that mature black (I must admit I do not know if the fact that I have other viburnums present lead to the production of berries since this was my first year with berries )  
  • Tolerant of most soil types (including NJ clay)  

Here it is fully leafed out in early spring

In full bloom in May

The leaves curled after blooming giving it an interesting design appeal

The berries emerging in August (which were quickly eaten by the birds)

Phenomenal fall color prior to the leaves falling off