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Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’

As I mentioned in a previous post, I’ve spent a lot of time reviewing my garden photos from the past year as I map out my big plans for this year. In a lot of ways, the photos tell a different story than what I experienced out in the garden – a welcomed different perspective. 
One plant I’ve come to appreciate even more through photos is Miscanthus ‘Variegatus’:     

This ornamental grass, with it’s variegation (equal parts white/green), is a welcome foil to all of the surrounding green foliage. I had no idea how many photos I had snapped of this beauty over the past year until recently. Before I share these with you, some bits of info are in order:

  • Mature size falls in the 5′ to 6′ range (a little taller when in bloom)
  • Survives in zones 5-9
  • Prefers full sun
  • Seems to be OK with most soil types including my poor draining clay
  • Is a “warm season” grass meaning the foliage starts to grow when the temps warm up later in spring
  • Flowers in mid to late September here in zone 6B. The blooms are reddish and tassel like.
  • Flopping over later in the season is a known problem due to its large size but one I’ve yet to experience.

Now on to the photos:

Here she is (far right) at about three feet tall in July:

The variegation shining through the Panicum blooms:

The foliage contrasting well behind a Viburnum and amongst a sea of green:

Glowing in early evening:

Looks fantastic back lit by the sun:

Contrasts so well with the early autumn foliage of Itea ‘Henry’s Garnet’:

And looks even better later in the fall:

The blooms emerge in late September:

And finally, like most ornamental grasses, they provide winter interest:

So what do you think? Are you a fan? Is staking a necessity?

Let me know already, won’t you?

John

9 thoughts on “Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’”

  1. I have had the cultivar “Strictus” for a couple of years, and really like it. It gets ZERO attention from me except to be cut down to about 8 inches tall in spring. This cultivar has a reputation for not splaying open, which some of the others tend to do. So far, my has stayed perfectly erect and tight for two full years.

  2. I don’t have this variety (have Malepartus and purpurascens). Malepartus does tend to splay open right around the time it blooms…but I’m going to try witholding water as much as I can to see fi that helps. As with most grasses, it’s usually too much wet or too rich of a soil that will make them flop over. If you haven’t had trouble with it flopping yet, I’m guessing you won’t in the future (unless the clump starts to die out in the center.

  3. Love the grasses. I have to be careful with the miscanthus as most do not stand well during the winter. I had Morning Light at my last home and it was beautiful, just don’t have the room at this house.

    Eileen

  4. I baught “Morning Light” today Sunday, july 29, 2012 from Home Depot for $ 21.97 including tax. I love it.

  5. Thanks for the pictures, it looks great. Just what I’m looking for to replace a very old and difficult to deal with variegated dwarf pampass grass which I’m going to get someone to remove this spring. Hope it won’t be too difficult. I want something to look similar to the pampass but to be easier to maintain and I think I’ve found it.
    I live in the Gt. Britain, close to London, I’ll have to search one out.

  6. it looks fantastic through the red panicum flowers.
    one thing ive noticed for anyone thinking of buying it without seeing it first is that the variegation is variable even within the same cultivar, some are alot more green or white than others.

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